Cabinet of Curiosities

Unlocking Knowledge by Jon Jaylo

Cabinet of Curiosities
An exhibit by Jon Jaylo, Ernst & Young Gallery, 29 November 2013 to 28 February 2014

In the days before museums were readily accessible, Cabinets of Curiosities were fantastic microcosms that attempted to document the full breadth and wonder of the world. Known as “Wunderkammern” or “Kunstkammern,” they were astonishingly eclectic assemblages of natural wonders (naturalia), scientific instruments (scientifica), precious art works (artificialia), ethnography (exotica), and inexplicable, magical objects (mirablia) that represented their creator’s interest in understanding and ordering the world.

Throughout history, many artists such as Frans II Francken, Albrecht Dürer, and more recently, Damien Hirst, as well as the Surrealists in particular (members of the the Exhibition of Surrealist Objects in Paris, 1937) — have drawn on the mysterium tremendum and liminality they had experienced through these curious collections to connect their art to the realm of dreams and non-rational knowledge. The writer and poet Andre Breton posited that Surrealist theory sought to “re-enchant the universe” and he believed that “ the crisis of objects could be overcome if the thing in all its strangeness could be seen as if anew.”

Like the early curators of kunstkammers, neo-surrealist Jon Jaylo has collected the strange and the sundry to create an exhibit of works that mediate with the world, albeit one created from his imagination. He displaces the meaning of ordinary images – apples, houses, keys and dominoes by removing them from their expected context, defamilarizing them and storing them on canvas, the “cabinet shelves” of his own unique vision.

In this exhibit, Jaylo presents his own virtual Cabinet of Curiosities, one that he says was “inspired by the ordeals we all endure and tackle, and more specifically the pain we experience. The paradox of life is that pain is an aphrodisiac for strength, clarity of thought, even confidence.”

“The Tale of Two Travelers” (Oil on canvas,122 x 91cm) shows a husband and wife improbably moving an old house across an ominous blue ocean. Their domicile restricts their vision, yet they blindly move forward, a methaphor perhaps for immigrants who struggle towards new land, hoping from greener pastures across the dark waters. The house is the couple’s container, the vitrine that keeps them seemingly safe yet cuts them off from reality.

“Unlocking Knowledge” is a small work featuring an antique key about to open an improbable lock on a red delicious apple –- the traditional symbol for the fruit of knowledge of good and evil. But what sort of knowledge is contained inside?

In “Finding Humility LR” a headless king sits on a tower of dominoes. A mysterious hand is shown to the left — either building the tower or perhaps taking it apart. Like the fate that befell Ozymandias in Percy Bysshe Shelley’s eponymous poem, the impending disaster is a reminder to those who have grown mighty that no matter what they create or how confident they grow, time will tear them all down.

Finding Humility by Jon Jaylo

All the paintings in Jaylo’s Cabinet of Curiosities form an obsessional and fantastic collection that celebrates the strange and numinous . His work is a reminder that Surrealism is alive and well, persisting as a meaningful reference for the artist’s particular visual sensibility, one where ordinary images are combined in unusual ways to suggest another, perhaps darker plane of reality. This is the sole unifying theme of the show — that of Jaylo wanting to guide his audience away from familiar things towards the unfamiliar, like a stack of kunstkammer shelves that lead towards the mysteries of Life.

Andre Breton’s 1928 Surrealist book Nadja ends with a ringing assertion: ‘Beauty will be convulsive or will not be at all.’ Jaylo’s work showcases an uncanny, convulsive beauty of its own, one which causes a frisson of the senses, filling the viewer with wonder while at the same time unsettling ordinary sensibilities with his extraordinary vision.

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58 Comments and the Blessed Feels

JaquesStation

Writing from the fringes of both genre and mainstream literature, I’m always surprised when someone says that they’ve read one of my stories (no, really).  Two weeks week ago I found out that a high school in Las Vegas, Nevada used “Blessed Are The Hungry” (Apex #62) as a study text for literature class. After reading it,  58 students left comments for me at Apex’s website. Most were very positive, a few critical, some were even quite effusive — but wow, 58 comments! That’s definitely a new record for me.

Here are some of my favorites:

From Kirsten Tan – “I thought that this story was engaging, and it was an interesting take on what can happen when you don’t fight back and how something horrible can continue to be perpetuated. I enjoyed reading about how the father and his sons chose to fight back instead of “suffer in silence,” and how this chain of events led to everyone finding out what was actually happening. I also felt concern when the mother told Elsa that she couldn’t go with her father simply because she’d be a great “breeder.” she’d It sort of reminded me of A Handmaid’s Tale, because women’s fertility were considered highly important.”

From Jordan – “Your story was very well written. It was very descriptive because of all the details, figurative language pieces, similes, etc. you added to your story. I found the part where Elsa was talking about all of these gruesome words to her younger sibling very disturbing and I can’t believe she was teaching those kinds of words to him but wow, this story gave such a different vibe than all the rest (which I really enjoyed). The dystopian, space feel was super cool to read in a book because I have never read anything like this before!

From Ariel Bloch – “This story is gruesome yet beautiful. A dying ship travelling through never ending darkness, with a spark of warmth and hope igniting in the dark. This terrifying yet realistic interpretation of the future keeps your eyes glued to the screen, and makes you fear, perhaps, your own dark thoughts and selfishness. The figurative language used in this short story sharpened my vision as I read, and encouraged me to dive further into this cold world. The moment you begin reading you get a sense of the foul society that Elsa lives in, and the hopelessness that has devoured generations as they were born and buried in the dark vacuum of space.”

From Anna Wood – “From the beginning, I was immediately intrigued by the execution scene. It was shocking how children were there to witness it. As the story progressed, it only became more and more fascinating. I like how you included a bit of mystery with the missing page and unknown levels of the spaceship. It left me questioning. At the end, I was still left with many questions. It was a very well written short story that I would definitely read as a book.

Although I did not write this story with secondary school readers in mind, I am very pleased that it was selected for them. Moreover, I am ecstatic that most of these kids seemed to enjoyed it (despite the scary parts). This is really a wonderful gift that they have given me. Without knowing it, these kids from Las Vegas and their wonderful, albeit anonymous, teacher have provided me with the encouragement I really needed to complete this story arc as a novel. Thank you so much!

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